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Kill Bill: Vol. 1 / B2 / advance / Japan

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: Vol. 1
AKA
Kiru Biru (Japan - poster title - English title)
Year of Film
2003
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus,
Type of Poster
B2
Style of Poster
Advance
Origin of Poster
Japan
Year of Poster
2003
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
20 6/16" x 28 13/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 / B1 / Kill is Love style / Japan

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: Vol. 2
AKA
--
Year of Film
2004
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu,
Type of Poster
B1
Style of Poster
Kill is Love
Origin of Poster
Japan
Year of Poster
2004
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
28 10/16" x 40 9/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 / B2 / DVD style / Japan

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: Vol. 2
AKA
--
Year of Film
2004
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu,
Type of Poster
B2
Style of Poster
DVD release
Origin of Poster
Japan
Year of Poster
2004
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
20 6/16" x 28 13/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Kill Baby Kill / B2 / Japan

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Baby Kill
AKA
Operazione Paura [Operation Fear] (Italy - original title) | Curse of the Dead (UK) | Curse of the Living Dead (USA - reissue title)
Year of Film
1966
Director
Mario Bava
Starring
Erica Blanc, Giacomo Rossi-Stuart, Giana Vivaldi, Fabienne Dali, Piero Lulli
Origin of Film
Italy
Genre(s) of Film
Erica Blanc, Giacomo Rossi-Stuart, Giana Vivaldi, Fabienne Dali, Piero Lulli,
Type of Poster
B2
Style of Poster
--
Origin of Poster
Japan
Year of Poster
1973
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
20 6/16" x 28 12/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Kill Bill: Volume 2 / quad / teaser / UK

18.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: Vol. 2
AKA
--
Year of Film
2004
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Michael Madsen, Daryl Hannah, Gordon Liu,
Type of Poster
Quad
Style of Poster
Teaser
Origin of Poster
UK
Year of Poster
2004
Designer
Empire Design
Artist
--
Size (inches)
30" x 40"
SS or DS
DS
Tagline
--

Licence to Kill / one sheet / international

17.05.11

Poster Poster

Licence to Kill / one sheet / teaser / ‘S’ version / USA

07.07.14

Poster Poster
Title
Licence to Kill
AKA
License to Kill (alternative, pre-release spelling)
Year of Film
1989
Director
John Glen
Starring
Timothy Dalton, Carey Lowell, Robert Davi, Talisa Soto, Anthony Zerbe, Frank McRae, David Hedison, Wayne Newton, Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Starke, Everett McGill, Desmond Llewelyn
Origin of Film
UK | USA
Genre(s) of Film
Timothy Dalton, Carey Lowell, Robert Davi, Talisa Soto, Anthony Zerbe, Frank McRae, David Hedison, Wayne Newton, Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Starke, Everett McGill, Desmond Llewelyn,
Type of Poster
One sheet
Style of Poster
Teaser - 'License' version
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
1989
Designer
Steven Chorney
Artist
Keith Hamshere (photography)
Size (inches)
27 1/16" x 41 1/16"
SS or DS
SS
NSS #
--
Tagline
His bad side is a dangerous place to be.

Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Licence to Kill, the sixteenth James Bond adventure, marked the end of an era in the franchise. Whilst certainly not in the running for best Bond film, it’s nevertheless a solid entry with excellent use of locations (actually forced due to budgetary constraints), a memorable bad guy in Robert Davi‘s drug kingpin Sanchez and a number of impressive stunt sequences. Fans of the original Ian Fleming novels often rate Licence to Kill as the film that’s closest to the original source material’s harder-edged action. Licence to Kill marked the last Bond film for director John Glen who had been involved in the series since 1969 and also saw legendary producer Albert R. Broccoli effectively retire from the reigns of a franchise he had begun with producing partner Harry Saltzman back in 1958. 

The story is significantly darker and grittier than anything that had come before in the series, particularly those films released during the Roger Moore era. It opens with Bond and old friend CIA agent Felix Leiter on the way to the latter’s wedding ceremony in Key West (Florida) when they’re informed that Sanchez, a wanted drug lord, has been spotted in the area. The pair manage to apprehend the kingpin after an exciting chase that ends with them parachuting out of a helicopter and landing in front of the church, just in time for the ceremony. After the title sequence (with the excellent Gladys Knight theme tune) things take a dark turn as Sanchez escapes and takes revenge on Felix and his new bride.

When Bond discovers a badly mutilated Leiter and his dead bride he vows revenge, but when his superiors deny his request and order him on another mission to Turkey, Bond flees and has his licence to kill revoked. With the help of one of Leiter’s friends, he follows a trail leading him from the Bahamas to the fictional Republic of Isthmus where Davi’s plan for global drugs domination is revealed. The film ends with a thrilling chase involving several tanker trucks along a dangerous highway, which is easily one of the most memorable action sequences in the series’ history. The film was Welsh actor Timothy Dalton‘s second appearance as 007 and would ultimately prove to be his last after a protracted legal wrangle meant that no Bond film was put into production until 1995’s Goldeneye, by which time the actor had moved on and was replaced by Pierce Brosnan.

The marketing of the film went through a number of iterations, designers and artists and, crucially, marked the first time that painted artwork gave way to a photographic montage. Despite some initial sketches and concepts by the legendary artist Bob Peak, MGM decided to commission a number of designers and artists to work on the posters, including American Steven Chorney who designed this particular advance one sheet, and British design firm FEREF (led by Robin Behling) which designed a montage that was used on the international one sheet, the British quad and for some other posters around the globe. Although initially produced under the title ‘Licence Revoked’, MGM feared that American audiences wouldn’t understand the second word and changed it to the title we know today. Note that there was some wrangling over whether to go with the American spelling ‘License’ or the British-English ‘Licence’. Eventually the latter won out, but not before these posters had been printed with the American spelling (the same poster also exists with ‘Licence’ too).

A View To A Kill / one sheet / recalled / UK

25.11.11

Poster Poster

Sir Roger Moore‘s last outing as James Bond, A View to a Kill, was definitely not his finest hour, although it is memorable for a few reasons, including Christopher Walken‘s turn as the truly psychotic bad guy (Max Zorin), Duran Duran’s great title theme and the appearance of the incomparable Grace Jones as Mayday, Zorin’s accomplice. She may not be able to act very well but she’s never anything less than a striking presence and is definitely not a lady to mess with, as British chat show presenter Russell Harty infamously found out.

This poster is the UK one sheet that was designed by Vic Fair and illustrated by Brian Bysouth, a not insignificant pairing of two great English talents. Having been commissioned by the studio the poster was apparently then rejected and ultimately never used in cinemas to promote the film. Sim Branaghan, the man behind the must-own book ‘British Film Posters‘, interviewed Vic Fair who recalled that they were looking for a more conventional design, something that often frustrated the designer when working with clients:

‘Not very exciting are they, the Bond posters … always the same thing. So I had this idea of putting him in a white jacket, but they just threw their arms up in horror – “Ooh no, we can’t have that”. It was ridiculous really’

The poster is now known as the ‘recalled’ UK one sheet as, despite the poster having been printed, it was recalled by the studio and most copies were apparently pulped. Obviously, several did manage to escape destruction and made their way into the hands of poster dealers and collectors. I’d like to know a rough figure on how many did survive since it does show up at major auctions and on Ebay occasionally, so it’s certainly more than a tiny handful. If anyone has any more details on this please get in touch or leave a comment.

The artwork did end up being used for other countries, notably a Japanese B2 poster promoting the film.

For more information on Vic Fair and Brian Bysouth I highly recommend picking up a copy of ‘British Film Posters‘ as it features sections on both men. Here are the posters I’ve collected so far by Brian Bysouth and those by Vic Fair (with more to add over the coming months).

In 2012 I met and interviewed Brian Bysouth and this poster was discussed:

There are two specific collaborations you had with Vic Fair that I’d like to talk about. There was the UK one sheet for A View to a Kill, which you mentioned, and before I read Sim’s book I had no idea that it was one of yours. It’s quite different to others you’d worked on before then.
Ah yes, that poster was painted with a different technique than the one I’d typically work with. It has a very smooth look mostly done with an airbrush. The clients had started to require illustrations to have a less painted look and they were asking for much more photo-realistic illustrations. This requirement was because of falling sales in the video market.  The clients had concluded that the paying public had become more discerning and distrustful of what was portrayed on the video sleeves, and to some extent on film posters. The public had begun to realise that an exciting illustration could flatter what in reality would be a truly awful film.  So illustration had to take on a new, more highly-finished look, but this only worked for a short while before the use of photographs and the versatility of the computer took over completely.

Anyway, to continue, Vic asked me if I’d like to do the finished painting based on his rough; it was a really excellent and novel design, which required me to execute the painting in two stages. The first stage would be used as a teaser poster and this was just the image ofGrace Jones and Bond contained within a diamond motif. All I had to do was get the airbrush out and work up his design. I remember spending a while on the Grace Jones image, polishing and improving her look, as well as the pose of Bond. It went away to be printed but later we were disappointed to learn that it was going to be withdrawn because the clients were not happy with the legendary spy being portrayed in a white tuxedo; that being considered not very Bond-like!

For the second stage, Vic’s design included an exciting montage to fit either side of the central icon of the two characters. The preliminary painting was returned to me for completion and I continued by adding the montage of scenes from the film onto the artwork in a semi-drawn style, which I was experimenting with at the time. I was very pleased with the final results and Vic liked it too. That went off for approval but, for reasons unknown to me, the printing didn’t go ahead. I never saw the artwork again and pathetically, because it was not approved, I don’t even think a transparency was made. I entertain hopes that one day it will eventually re-appear and I will be able to establish my claim to ownership.

Here’s the film’s original trailer.

A View To A Kill / one sheet / USA

06.08.12

Poster Poster

Sir Roger Moore‘s last outing as James Bond was definitely not his finest hour, although it is memorable for a few reasons, including Christopher Walken‘s turn as the psychotic bad guy (Max Zorin), Duran Duran’s great title theme and the appearance of the incomparable Grace Jones as Mayday, Zorin’s accomplice. She may not be the greatest actress but she’s never anything less than a striking presence and is definitely not a lady to mess with, as British chat show presenter Russell Harty infamously found out.

This US one sheet features imagery from the climactic fight atop the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, which sees Bond and Stacey Sutton (Tanya Roberts) face off against Zorin and his henchmen in the Zorin Industries airship. Special effects supervisor John Richardson filmed a series of sequences featuring stunt performers on top of the actual bridge that were later matched up against green-screen shots of the actors. This was the first Bond film to have its premiere held outside the UK; it opened on the 22nd of May, 1985 at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts.

The artwork is by American poster artist Dan Goozee who was also responsible for a few Bond posters, including Moonraker and Octopussy, as well as several other classic posters from the 1980s. The other designs I’ve collected by him can be seen here.

Permission To Kill / 30×40 / USA

26.01.12

Poster Poster
Title
Permission To Kill
AKA
The Executioner (alt. title)
Year of Film
1975
Director
Cyril Frankel
Starring
Dirk Bogarde, Ava Gardner, Bekim Fehmiu, Timothy Dalton, Nicole Calfan, Frederic Forrest, Klaus Wildbolz, Anthony Dutton, Peggy Sinclair, Dennis Blanch, John Levene
Origin of Film
UK | Austria | USA
Genre(s) of Film
Dirk Bogarde, Ava Gardner, Bekim Fehmiu, Timothy Dalton, Nicole Calfan, Frederic Forrest, Klaus Wildbolz, Anthony Dutton, Peggy Sinclair, Dennis Blanch, John Levene,
Type of Poster
30x40
Style of Poster
--
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
1975
Designer
Unknown
Artist
Robert Tanenbaum
Size (inches)
30 2/16" x 40"
SS or DS
SS
NSS #
75/273
Tagline
This is Mr. Curtis. He has permission to bloody you, compromise you, blackmail you and if all else fails...

I’ll admit to not having seen this 1975 political spy thriller starring Dirk Bogarde, Ava Gardner and a pre-Bond Timothy Dalton, but going by the lack of information, reviews and discussion of the film on IMDb, I am not alone. It doesn’t appear to have been released on DVD and I could only find evidence of a UK VHS release (on Amazon).

One of the only reviews I could find has this to say:

Permission to kill has got to be one of the WORST films ever made, The directing from Frankel is appaling, The story is needlessly complicated and confusing, and the actors (especially Bogarde) look like they’d rather be somewhere else, but above all absolutely NOTHING happens.

Even if the film is not one to seek out, this poster, with artwork by American artist Robert Tanenbaum, is definitely an interesting one. I really like the composition and use of masking within the shadow of the mysterious ‘Mr Curtis’. Tanenbaum clearly has a thing for horizontal ladies, as evidenced here and on his poster for A Boy and His Dog. The colours work well against the grey background and the title logo is also fairly unusual for the time period (being hand drawn and brightly coloured).

To see other posters I’ve collected by Robert Tanenbaum click here.

The original trailer (with Danish subs) can be found on YouTube.

A View To A Kill / one sheet / advance / white style / USA

10.06.13

Poster Poster
Title
A View To A Kill
AKA
The Beautiful Prey (Japan - English title)
Year of Film
1985
Director
John Glen
Starring
Roger Moore, Christopher Walken, Tanya Roberts, Grace Jones, Patrick Macnee, Patrick Bauchau, David Yip, Fiona Fullerton, Manning Redwood, Alison Doody, Willoughby Gray, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell
Origin of Film
UK
Genre(s) of Film
Roger Moore, Christopher Walken, Tanya Roberts, Grace Jones, Patrick Macnee, Patrick Bauchau, David Yip, Fiona Fullerton, Manning Redwood, Alison Doody, Willoughby Gray, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell,
Type of Poster
One sheet
Style of Poster
Advance - white style
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
1985
Designer
Unknown
Artist
Dan Goozee
Size (inches)
27" x 41 1/16"
SS or DS
SS
NSS #
850004
Tagline
Has James Bond finally made his match? | Find out this summer.

A View to a Kill, Sir Roger Moore‘s last outing as James Bond was definitely not his finest hour, although it is memorable for a few reasons, including Christopher Walken‘s turn as the psychotic bad guy Max Zorin, Duran Duran’s great title theme and the appearance of the incomparable Grace Jones as Mayday, Zorin’s accomplice. She may not be the greatest actress but she’s never anything less than a striking presence and is definitely not a lady to mess with, as British chat show presenter Russell Harty infamously found out.

The film features a climactic fight atop the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, which sees Bond and Stacey Sutton (Tanya Roberts) face off against Zorin and his henchmen in the Zorin Industries airship. Special effects supervisor John Richardson filmed a series of sequences featuring stunt performers on top of the actual bridge that were later matched up against green-screen shots of the actors. This was the first Bond film to have its premiere held outside the UK; it opened on the 22nd of May, 1985 at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts.

The excellent artwork on this advance one sheet (those are some very long legs!) is by the American poster artist Dan Goozee who was also responsible for a few other Bond posters, including Moonraker and Octopussy, as well as several other classic designs from the 1980s. The other posters I’ve collected by him can be seen here.

Kill Bill: Volume 1 / quad / UK

18.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: Volume 1
AKA
Kiru Biru (Japan - poster title - English title)
Year of Film
2003
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus,
Type of Poster
Quad
Style of Poster
Final
Origin of Poster
UK
Year of Poster
2003
Designer
Empire Design
Artist
--
Size (inches)
30" x 40"
SS or DS
DS
Tagline
A roaring rampage of revenge

Hard To Kill / one sheet / USA

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Hard To Kill
AKA
Seven Year Storm (USA - working title)
Year of Film
1990
Director
Bruce Malmuth
Starring
Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock, William Sadler, Frederick Coffin, Bonnie Burroughs, Andrew Bloch, Branscombe Richmond, Charles Boswell
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock, William Sadler, Frederick Coffin, Bonnie Burroughs, Andrew Bloch, Branscombe Richmond, Charles Boswell,
Type of Poster
One sheet
Style of Poster
--
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
1990
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
27" x 40 2/8"
SS or DS
SS
NSS #
--
Tagline
He's L.A. detective Mason Storm. Three hired assassins left him for dead. And he's waited seven years to even the score.

Dressed To Kill / B2 / black style / Japan

17.05.11

Poster Poster
Title
Dressed To Kill
AKA
--
Year of Film
1980
Director
Brian De Palma
Starring
Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen, Keith Gordon, Dennis Franz, David Margulies, Ken Baker, Susanna Clemm, Brandon Maggart
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen, Keith Gordon, Dennis Franz, David Margulies, Ken Baker, Susanna Clemm, Brandon Maggart,
Type of Poster
B2
Style of Poster
Black style
Origin of Poster
Japan
Year of Poster
1980
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
20 5/16" x 28 12/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Dressed To Kill / quad / UK

16.05.12

Poster Poster
Title
Dressed To Kill
AKA
--
Year of Film
1980
Director
Brian De Palma
Starring
Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen, Keith Gordon, Dennis Franz, David Margulies, Ken Baker, Susanna Clemm, Brandon Maggart
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen, Keith Gordon, Dennis Franz, David Margulies, Ken Baker, Susanna Clemm, Brandon Maggart,
Type of Poster
Quad
Style of Poster
--
Origin of Poster
UK
Year of Poster
1980
Designer
Unknown
Artist
--
Size (inches)
30" x 40"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
Every Nightmare Has A Beginning...This One Never Ends

Brian De Palma‘s 1980 erotic crime thriller Dressed to Kill is frequently held up as a high-watermark in the career of the virtuoso director, and the film saw him perfecting the technical and stylistic flourishes he had been honing in the years before with films such as Sisters (1973) and Obsession (1976). Blending obvious homages to Hitchcock (Vertigo and Psycho for starters) with several hallmarks of the Italian Giallo genre, the film features multiple plot twists and outlandish sequences, including the murder of one of the main characters after 35 minutes.

The plot ostensibly focuses on the murder of a sexually frustrated housewife, and the subsequent investigation by her son and the high-class call girl who was the only witness to the crime. It features memorable turns from Angie DickinsonNancy Allen (De Palma’s wife at the time) and Michael Caine in one of his more atypical performances. The reveal of the identity of the killer is one of the film’s most infamous moments and certainly lingers long in the memory after the credits roll.

This British quad is as subdued as the US one sheet, sharing the same stylised image of the killer peeking through the bathroom door (if memory serves me correctly this particular image was created specifically for the poster). The American one sheet features the moniker that De Palma had been given at the time; ‘The Master of the Macabre’.

The trailer is on YouTube.

A View To A Kill / one sheet / advance / Eiffel Tower style / USA

29.09.14

Poster Poster
Title
A View To A Kill
AKA
The Beautiful Prey (Japan - English title)
Year of Film
1985
Director
John Glen
Starring
Roger Moore, Christopher Walken, Tanya Roberts, Grace Jones, Patrick Macnee, Patrick Bauchau, David Yip, Fiona Fullerton, Manning Redwood, Alison Doody, Willoughby Gray, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell
Origin of Film
UK
Genre(s) of Film
Roger Moore, Christopher Walken, Tanya Roberts, Grace Jones, Patrick Macnee, Patrick Bauchau, David Yip, Fiona Fullerton, Manning Redwood, Alison Doody, Willoughby Gray, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell,
Type of Poster
One sheet
Style of Poster
Advance - Eiffel Tower style
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
1985
Designer
Unknown
Artist
Dan Goozee
Size (inches)
27 1/16" x 41"
SS or DS
SS
NSS #
850004
Tagline
Adventure above and beyond all other Bonds

A View to a Kill, Sir Roger Moore‘s last outing as James Bond was definitely not his finest hour, although it is memorable for a few reasons, including Christopher Walken‘s turn as the psychotic bad guy Max Zorin, Duran Duran’s great title theme and the appearance of the incomparable Grace Jones as Mayday, Zorin’s accomplice. She may not be the greatest actress but she’s never anything less than a striking presence and is definitely not a lady to mess with, as British chat show presenter Russell Harty infamously found out.

The film features a climactic fight atop the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, which sees Bond and Stacey Sutton (Tanya Roberts) face off against Zorin and his henchmen in the Zorin Industries airship. Special effects supervisor John Richardson filmed a series of sequences featuring stunt performers on top of the actual bridge that were later matched up against green-screen shots of the actors. This was the first Bond film to have its premiere held outside the UK; it opened on the 22nd of May, 1985 at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts.

The excellent artwork depicting an action scene on the Eiffel Tower in Paris (which is not exactly accurate in terms of events in the film) is by the American poster artist Dan Goozee who was also responsible for the other ‘legs’ advance and the final US one sheet which features another action-packed scene. He also worked on the posters for a few other Bond posters, including Moonraker and Octopussy, as well as several other classic posters designs from the 1980s. The other posters I’ve collected by him can be seen here.

Kill Bill – The Whole Bloody Affair / screen print / Tyler Stout / regular / USA

21.03.12

Poster Poster
Title
Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair
AKA
Kiru Biru (Japan - poster title - English title)
Year of Film
2003
Director
Quentin Tarantino
Starring
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus
Origin of Film
USA
Genre(s) of Film
Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, Julie Dreyfus,
Type of Poster
Screen print
Style of Poster
Regular
Origin of Poster
USA
Year of Poster
2011
Designer
Tyler Stout
Artist
Tyler Stout
Size (inches)
24" x 35 15/16"
SS or DS
SS
Tagline
--

Quentin Tarantino‘s Kill Bill was originally planned and filmed with the intention of releasing it as one long movie. At a certain point in post-production the decision was taken to release it as two separate films, which allowed Tarantino to include more material in each one rather than be forced to make cuts to shorten the running time at the studio’s request.

The longer cut, known as The Whole Bloody Affair, has long been on many film fans’ wish lists of ‘unreleased alternative cuts of films they’d love to see’ and until last year it had only been screened once, at the Cannes Film Festival in 2006. In March 2011 the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles (check the billboard), which is owned by Tarantino, screened TWBA and allowed fans of the film to finally catch this elusive version. A report from that screening can be read here.

The first showing coincided with Tarantino’s birthday and people on his production team decided they’d put together a secret present for him in the form of a specially commissioned poster by the team at Mondo. Ace artist Tyler Stout was given the opportunity to illustrate his take on the film and the result is one of his best posters yet, in my opinion. As with his Akira print I wanted to interview Tyler about its production. He kindly agreed to answer my questions and also sent along a series of alternative images that were changed during production.

The article can be read here.

The White Buffalo / B2 / Japan

30.09.11

Poster Poster

Who wouldn’t want to see a film featuring a buffalo the size of a small skyscraper?! An exciting illustration for this 1977 Bronson versus beast film, The White Buffalo, which teamed the star with director J. Lee Thompson, a frequent collaborator. The film is often described as a western version of Jaws and was one of a few ‘man versus beast’ tales filmed by legendary producer Dino De Laurentiis in the wake of Spielberg’s mega-hit (including the ’76 King Kong and Orca).

I’m not certain who the artist of this poster is but I have a feeling it may be the work of Seito, one of my favourite Japanese artists. If anyone knows for sure please get in touch. It has a few elements seen on the US one sheet by Boris Vallejo (which features an excellent tagline).

Check out the original trailer on YouTube.”…starring Charles Bronson as Wild Bill Hicock, a man who feared nothing except being afraid!’

A bit of trivia (courtesy of Wikipedia): White Buffalo are considered sacred signs by several Native American religions and have great spiritual significance for them. The animals are visited for prayers and other ceremonies. Apparently they’re so rare that they only occur in one in 10 million births.

Tyler Stout on the creation of his Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair screen print

21.03.12

Quentin Tarantino‘s Kill Bill was originally planned and filmed with the intention of releasing it as one long movie. At a certain point in post-production the decision was taken to release it as two separate films, which allowed Tarantino to include more material in each one rather than be forced to make cuts to shorten the running time at the studio’s request.

The longer cut, known as The Whole Bloody Affair, has long been on many film fans’ wish-lists of ‘unreleased alternative cuts of films they’d love to see’ and until last year it had only been screened once, at the Cannes Film Festival in 2006. In March 2011 the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles (check the billboard), which is owned by Tarantino, screened TWBA and allowed fans of the film to finally catch this elusive version. A report from that screening can be read here.

The first showing coincided with Tarantino’s birthday and people on his production team decided they’d put together a secret present for him in the form of a specially commissioned poster by the team at Mondo. Ace artist Tyler Stout was given the opportunity to illustrate his take on the film and the result is one of his best posters yet, in my opinion. As with his Akira print I wanted to interview Tyler about its production. He kindly agreed to answer my questions and also sent along a series of alternative images that were changed during production.

Tyler Stout’s screen print for Kill Bill: TWBA – this is a photograph of the regular version from my collection.

Tyler Stout’s screen print for Kill Bill: TWBA – this is a photograph of the regular version from my collection.

Hi Tyler, thanks for agreeing to talk about the print. Is it right that Mondo were approached by Tarantino’s people to do a poster for the screening of the full cut?
That is correct. His assistant [Julie McLean) asked Mondo if they would help to do a poster to commemorate the event, as well as kind of a birthday present to Quentin.

The screening was a surprise for Tarantino but I’ve heard he’s a huge fan of yours. Were you specifically requested when Mondo were approached?
I know he’s a huge Mondo fan, so I think he would have loved anything they would have done for the event, but mondo approached me about it and it worked out and that was awesome.

Like most folks, I’ve yet to see the two films as one. Were you able to see the new cut before starting work on the print or were you working from viewings of the two separate films?
I haven’t seen The Whole Bloody Affair cut yet, sadly, so I was just going off of what I’d heard etc.

The variant version of the poster - aside from the obvious addition of the Japanese title there are several other differences to be found.

The variant version of the poster – aside from the obvious addition of the Japanese title there are several other differences to be found.

It must have been good knowing you had all the characters to choose from, as opposed to only doing one of the films and being limited in that way?
That was indeed awesome; two great films that feel like one film. It definitely would have been more limiting to just have one to deal with.

Is it true that you only had three weeks to put this poster together? Do you enjoy working under that kind of time pressure?
I wish we’d had three weeks to put this together! It was a bit shorter than that, but I do like working with time constraints and I seem to work best under them actually. Otherwise I’ll just keep revising and revising the poster.

Can you talk about your initial design ideas for the poster? Were there certain characters that you knew had to be given more prominence than others?
It was pretty organic, the way it kinda came together. I just gave prominence to the characters I felt strongest about and kinda went from there.

Was the composition something you arrived at quickly? Were there certain elements you knew had to sit next to each other?
The initial idea for the poster came pretty quickly after being asked to do it. Like anything, you start thinking about it and then come up with an idea and go from there,  but as for certain elements….not really.

The US one sheet for Bruce Lee's Enter the Dragon

The US one sheet for Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon

Am I correct in thinking that you’re slightly homaging the original Enter the Dragon one sheet with the layout?
Ha! I wouldn’t say slightly, I’d say wholesale lift! It was definitely the starting and ending point of my original idea, which was referencing one of my favourite martial arts movie posters of all time. I tried to do it in an obvious way to avoid any confusion.

Are there any elements you illustrated but that didn’t make it into the final version?
There were actually quite a few things that didn’t make it. I’d drawn a bunch of Bucks but I just couldn’t find a way to make it work. We all made the call to drop him. I don’t think I had included him originally so the pieces I drew with him were all after the fact, and it can be hard to add stuff and make it look natural after the poster is more or less done.

An illustration of the character Buck (Michael Bowen) that was dropped from the final poster

An illustration of the character Buck (Michael Bowen) that was dropped from the final poster

I’d also drawn a different pose for Gogo Yubari, but in the end I felt it worked better as you see it in the final version. A lot of the changes were me not feeling someting and trying to improve it.

An alternative version of Gogo Yubari (Chiaki Kuriyama) that was dropped in favour of the portrait version seen on the final printing. Note the chain-ball weapon's placement versus the printed version.

An alternative version of Gogo Yubari (Chiaki Kuriyama) that was dropped in favour of the portrait version seen on the final printing. Note the chain-ball weapon’s placement versus the printed version.

There were drawings of Larry Bishop and Sid Haig that didn’t make the final cut and they were kind of corner portraits that you’d sometimes see in posters with ornate borders. They didn’t get much beyond the concept stage before they were nixed.

Small character portraits that were dropped from the poster, including Jay (Sid Haig) and Larry Gomez (Larry Bishop)

Small character portraits that were dropped from the poster, including Jay (Sid Haig) and Larry Gomez (Larry Bishop)

Finally, I had a couple different versions of Elle Driver but I much preferred the version we went with.

An alternative version of Elle Driver (Daryl Hannah) that was replaced with a different pose in the final version

An alternative version of Elle Driver (Daryl Hannah) that was replaced with a different pose in the final version

The variant has a few alterations beyond the colour palette swap, can you talk about the changes you made and why?
We presented the original version and Quentin’s assistant had some ideas to make it better, so we did those, and in the end we kinda had two different posters with unique elements. We liked both and we hated to lose some of the pieces that were changed from the original design, so we included those on the variants, which made everybody happy.

The addition of the coffin scene is probably the most significant one, aside from the Japanese text. What made you add that image to the variant?
That was a suggestion of Quentin’s assistant. She really liked that scene and wanted to add it, so we did. As I say, we also liked it without so left it off the variant. I like it both ways, but it certainly tells a bit more of the story.

Were there any challenges with designing the variant to be printed on rice paper in terms of colours etc?
The challenges were certainly faced by my printer, but not directly by me. Rice paper is more waxy so they have to make sure the ink doesn’t rub off. I actually had a stamp made for the back of all my copies, but I could only stamp the backs of the regulars since on the variants it would just smear all over the place, never quite drying. I lost a few variants before I figured that out!

An alternative version of the poster, featuring several details that were eventually changed by the final printing.

An alternative version of the poster, featuring several details that were eventually changed by the final printing.

Once you’d submitted the poster were you given any directions by the Mondo guys for things to add or remove?
Again, most of them were from Quentin’s assistant and she had some suggestions that she thought he would appreciate. I know she wanted us to make a reference to Bruce Lee’s Game of Death instead of Enter the Dragon, but it was too late in the process to make that switch, plus Game of Death’s poster isn’t as iconic.

Were there ever any alternate colourways?
I think pretty early on Rob Jones [at Mondo] mentioned the rice paper type paper and we focused on that being the variant. There was a single one-off version on metal that was done especially for Quentin to take home as a birthday present.

The special one of metal variant of the poster that was given to Quentin Tarantino as a birthday present.

The special one of metal variant of the poster that was given to Quentin Tarantino as a birthday present. There is a unique inscription in the bottom left which reads ‘Q HAPPY BIRTHDAY AND CONTINUED ADVENTURES. WITH LOVE, UNRULY JULIE.’ 01/01

 

Close up detail of the metal variant

Close up detail of the metal variant

 

More details of the metal variant

More details of the metal variant

Were you given any feedback from Tarantino yourself?
Just that he was happy with the poster. He seems like a pretty easy going guy to deal with and doesn’t complain to Mondo much.

Are there other Tarantino films you’d like to do a poster for?
Sure, all of them.

I’m keeping my fingers crossed that you get to do a poster for Django Unchained.
That would be pretty sweet.

Finally, can you give us even a tiny hint as to what we might see from you in the coming months?
I think I’m working on something for the movie Drive, and possibly something involving aliens from outer space and the duality of man. I’ve probably given too much away.

Thanks so much Tyler. As always, I hugely appreciate the time you give to these interviews.
Thank you sir!

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Check out Tyler’s website here.
The Mondo website is here and I’d advise following them on Twitter here.

The other posters I’ve collected by Tyler can be viewed here.
My interview with Tyler on the creation of his Akira print is here.